Uncategorized

American Jewish Leaders Call Trump’s Ideas on Israel ‘Terrifying’ and ‘Bizarre’

The ZOA’s Klein says Trump and Netanyahu might be discussing the possibility of a confederation with partial Jordanian rule over West Bank Palestinians.

US President Donald Trump and Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shakes hands during a joint press conference in the East Room of the White House on February 15, 2017 in Washington, DC.

US President Donald Trump and Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shakes hands during a joint press conference in the East Room of the White House on February 15, 2017 in Washington, DC. MANDEL NGAN/AFP
After Trump meeting, Netanyahu says willing to examine reining in settlement construction
Analysis Despite Trump’s statements, Abbas and Palestinians get another reprieve
Former U.S. ambassadors urge Senate not to confirm Friedman as Trump’s Israel envoy
NEW YORK – Liberal American Jewish leaders responded with concern Thursday after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and U.S. President Donald Trump’s meeting, calling the president’s willingness to drop the two-state solution “terrifying” and even “bizarre”.
>> Get all updates on Israel and the U.S.: Download our free App, and Subscribe >>
However, others like the Zionist Organization of America’s Morton Klein, struck a different tone and found it cause for optimism.
Netanyahu said at the press conference, “For the first time in my lifetime and in the life of my country, Arab countries in the region do not see Israel as an enemy but increasingly as an ally,” the prime minister said. “This change creates an unprecedented opportunity to strengthen security and reach peace.”
What he meant, claimed Klein, is “the possibility of having some sort of confederation of Jordan with the Palestinian Arabs who live in Judea and Samaria.”
“With other Arab states deeply worried about Iran, it’s a potential opportunity to have other Arab states support this type of federation,” Klein told Haaretz. “Especially when you heard President Trump say ‘we don’t have to be committed to a Palestinian state, we’re committed to peace.’ You never heard any other president say that.”
Trump said he is not wedded to a two state resolution and is happy to go with whatever the parties themselves prefer. “I’m looking at two states and one,” he said. “I am very happy with the one both parties like. I thought for a while that two states were the way to go. But honestly if Bibi and the Palestinians are happy, I’m happy.”
>> Trump Did His Homework on One Touchy Issue Before Meeting Netanyahu // Explained: Two-state Solution – What Exactly Did Trump Say? // Trump Blew the Chance to Denounce anti-Semitism. Netanyahu Bailed Him Out With a Kosher Stamp // A Wounded Trump Hurts a Wounded Netanyahu. And the Israeli Right Smells Blood
Reaction to the joint press conference came swift and strong from other American Jewish organizational leaders. And far less positive than the ZOA’s Klein was.
“I’m not sure Trump understands the implications” of a one state solution, said Rabbi Jill Jacobs, executive director of T’ruah: the Rabbinic Call for Human Rights. “It is a very dangerous suggestion.”
Americans for Peace Now spokesman Ori Nir called the press conference “terrifying” and “a squandered opportunity” to “signal to Israelis, Palestinians, Americans and the world a clear commitment to peace.”
It was a chance to “chart a constructive way forward for U.S.-Israel relations and for Israel’s future, for its security and its wellbeing as a democracy and a Jewish state,” Nir said.  Instead, “the two leaders are not only depriving Israel of the very possibility of reaching peace but also undermining Israel’s own future as a democracy and a Jewish state” when they discuss a one-state possibility. He added, “they are delivering a huge victory to extremists on both sides.”
The Reform Movement’s Rabbi Rick Jacobs said he views Trump’s statements as “an abdication of the longtime, bipartisan support for a two-state solution.” The one state possibility discussed “is potentially devastating to the prospects for peace and Israel’s Jewish, democratic future. Prime Minister Netanyahu’s endorsement of such a policy change is no less ill-advised,” wrote Jacobs in a statement from the Union for Reform Judaism, which he heads.
Still, Trump asked Netanyahu to “hold back” on settlements. The URJ wrote, “we welcome that statement, and note that it shows just how broad the consensus against new settlement in the West Bank is.”
What about anti-Semitism?
When an Israeli reporter asked Trump directly about his administration’s role in the spike in anti-Semitic incidents since his presidential campaign, the president evaded a direct answer, instead meandering through discussion of his margin of victory in the electoral college vote, pointing out that his daughter and her husband and children are Jewish, and saying that the U.S. will “see a lot of love” over the next four or eight years.
“His response was baffling,” Anti-Defamation League CEO Jonathan Greenblatt told Haaretz.  The issue “is not electoral votes. It’s about the wave of hate crimes since the election and the spike in anti-Semitism across the country,” he said. “President Trump seemed uninformed about this issue and missed an opportunity to decry the rhetoric of hate that seems to be surging online and in the real world.  Intentional or not, this emboldens anti-Semites.”
T’ruah’s Jacobs called his response “so bizarre.”
“Over and over he has empowered white supremacists and he did the same thing today,”  she said. “He’s never said straight up one word that anti-Semitism is not acceptable. Even when he was straight out asked. How hard would it have been for him to say ‘I’m really disturbed about the uptick of anti-Semitism and any of my supporters should cease any anti-Semitic behavior,’” asked Jacobs.

Steve Bannon, chief strategist for U.S. President Donald Trump, listens during a news conference with Trump and Benjamin Netanyahu, Israeli’s prime minister, not pictured, in the East Room of the WhitPete Marovich/Bloomberg
Rep. Jerrold Nadler, a Democrat who represents the Upper West Side of Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn in Congress, noted that Breitbart News – which he called “the flagship publication of the alt-right” – was given a front row seat at the press conference. That “should be a terrifying signal of the associations being made by this Administration and questions must be asked of the policies and directions coming from this White House.  Mr. Trump’s silence earlier today in the face of these questions shows a sickening disregard for the safety and rights of not just Jews, but all minority groups across America.”
ZOA’s Klein interpreted Trump’s response far more benignly.
It was “a newly formed politician’s way of avoiding a question he didn’t want to answer. That’s my speculation but people have told me that they are concerned about it,”  said Klein, referring to anti-Semitism. “I would assume that they’re talking behind the scenes about what can be done about this, and assume he didn’t feel it appropriate to talk about actions they’re thinking of taking.”
Congresswoman Nita Lowey, a Democrat who represents areas just north of New York City that include Hasidic municipalities like New Square, said “a two-state solution for Israelis and Palestinians is the only means to ensure Israel’s long-term security and enable Palestinian aspirations for their own state.
Lowey, who is Jewish, wrote in a statement, “that is why presidents from both parties, the vast majorities of the House and Senate, and the American people have consistently supported this objective, and why President Trump must as well.”
Asked if she believes the regional paradigm briefly presented at the press conference could lead to peace, Jacobs said, “I don’t see any way that this team will attain peace. Neither of them wants it. Netanyahu clearly wants a continuation of the status quo forever, and we don’t now to what extent Trump understands the issues involved. He says on the fly that he is open to one or two states, but it’s not clear that he understands the implications of either.”
What’s more, added Jacobs, Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner, who he has said will steer the Israel-Palestine peace process, “no matter how many years Jared spent at Jewish summer camp, there’s no evidence that he has knowledge about how to broker a deal.”
read more: http://www.haaretz.com/us-news/.premium-1.772061

Scientists can’t seem to figure out how ancient Mars got so warm

NASA’s Curiosity rover shoots down a big theory explaining how liquid lakes and rivers flowed on the Red Planet

mars2

After four and a half years of exploring Mars, NASA’s Curiosity rover has made a new discovery that only deepens a long-standing mystery about the Red Planet — namely, how the world used to be so wet. Pretty much all Mars scientists agree that billions of years ago the planet had flowing rivers and lakes on its surface. But there’s a problem: no one can quite explain how ancient Mars was warm enough back then to support liquid water. And Curiosity is unearthing clues that only make things more confusing.

Since its landing in a region called Gale Crater, the rover has found critical signs that liquid water once pooled on the Martian surface. Curiosity has been scouring over hundreds of meters of sedimentary rocks that are thought to have been deposited by a lake that existed in the crater 3.5 billion years ago. But there’s an issue with timing: back when Mars supposedly had water on its surface, the Sun wasn’t cranking out that much heat. It’s a conundrum known as the “faint young Sun paradox,” and it’s the idea that our Solar System’s star was only producing about 70 percent of the energy as it does today. That means there must have been some other factor that warmed Mars up enough so that surface water existed as a liquid.

One leading idea is that the Martian atmosphere was thick with carbon dioxide, a potent greenhouse gas that traps heat. If the amount of CO2 was high enough, it could have theoretically warmed Mars up to the necessary temperature for lakes and rivers to flow on the surface. But Curiosity has all but torpedoed that theory. A new study, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, reveals that the rover hasn’t found a crucial byproduct of an ancient carbon dioxide atmosphere.

If Mars did have a thick carbon dioxide atmosphere, the gas would have dissolved into the water on Mars and formed something called carbonic acid. This acid tends to weather rocks underneath the water, eventually producing a substance known as carbonate minerals. However, these minerals haven’t been found by Curiosity. “Under a very thick CO2-rich atmosphere, the sediment that forms in lakes and rivers are expected to have carbonate minerals,” Thomas Bristow, a scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center and lead author on the study, tells The Verge. “But we haven’t seen them in any of the rocks at Gale Crater.”

Bedrock in Gale Crater indicates that a lake once existed here but that there wasn’t much carbon dioxide in Mars’ atmosphere.
Photo: NASA / JPL-Caltech / MSSS

It doesn’t mean that carbonates are absent from Mars. Researchers have certainly found the mineral on the Red Planet before. The new findings just means that Curiosity’s CheMin instrument — a tool that beams X-rays onto samples of rocks to look for minerals — hasn’t been able to detect any of this substance in Gale Crater. The CheMin instrument can pick up carbonates if they make up just a few percent of a rock that’s being analyzed. But since Curiosity hasn’t picked up any signs of carbonates, the mineral is under the detection limits of the instrument. “If there are carbonates there, they’re in teeny tiny amounts,” says Bristow.

That doesn’t bode well for the thick CO2 atmosphere theory. In order for ancient Mars to be warm enough to support liquid water, the planet would have needed carbon dioxide at a pressure of one bar. That’s about one Earth atmosphere’s worth of CO2. However, given the detection limit on Curiosity’s CheMin instrument and the lack of carbonates found, NASA estimates that the atmospheric carbon was tens to hundreds of times less than one bar of pressure.

It’s a finding that backs up what spacecraft have found in orbit around Mars. Numerous vehicles circulating the planet haven’t found as many carbonates on Mars as researchers had expected either, and Curiosity’s findings seem to confirm that the compound isn’t as abundant as previously thought on the Red Plant. “When you make your observations from space, there’s always a way to kind of explain the lack of carbonate that’s been found. Perhaps the satellites are looking in the wrong place,” says Bristow. “But now we’re able to ground the truth in what’s been seen from space.” So it’s looking more and more unlikely that Mars’ ancient atmosphere was saturated with CO2.

NASA’s Curiosity rover.
Photo: NASA

Of course, there are numerous other greenhouse gases that could have heated up ancient Mars, such as sulfur dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and even hydrogen. There’s one theory that early Mars was plagued by many volcanic eruptions, which put sulfur dioxide in the atmosphere and kept the planet warm. But that model doesn’t seem to totally fit, since such a warming from eruptions would have only lasted for hundreds to thousands of years, says Bristow. “That’s not what we see in the rock records,” he says. “It implies the surface was warm for hundreds of thousands or millions of years.”

There’s also the idea that perhaps Mars wasn’t that hot, and that the lake in Gale Crater was capped off with a layer of ice. That ice may have acted like a blanket and kept the water warm enough underneath to remain as a liquid. But this theory also isn’t satisfying, says Bristow, because Curiosity hasn’t seen any signs of ancient glacial processes in the sedimentary rocks at Gale Crater.

And then there’s the idea that perhaps Mars’ orbit changed and that the planet somehow got closer to the Sun billions of years ago. That concept is a bit hard to test, though, which means this mystery is far from being solved. “It really is a puzzle,” says Bristow. “People have been thinking about carbon dioxide-rich atmospheres on Mars for a really long time… Perhaps there is some kind of localized mechanism for keeping lakes warm that hasn’t been considered before.”

 

Hey, Team Trump: Tell America what’s in the Iran deal

Hey, Team Trump: Tell America what’s in the Iran dealHey, Team Trump: Tell America what’s in the Iran deal

Romania protests endure as president says country in crisis

BUCHAREST, Romania (AP) — Romania’s president told lawmakers Tuesday that the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive.

In an address to Parliament, President Klaus Iohannis, a critic of the two-month-old government, said the majority of Romanians now believed the country was going in the wrong direction.

“Romania needs a government that is transparent, which governs predictably by the light of day, not sneakily at night,” the president said, referring to the late hour the government passed an emergency ordinance last week aimed at decriminalizing some forms of official corruption.

People gather for a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a "full...

People gather for a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)

The move — which bypassed Parliament and was not signed off by Iohannis, who has limited powers — ignited the biggest protests seen since communism ended in the country in 1989. As a result, the government will now seek to introduce the plan in Parliament.

Thousands gathered for the eighth consecutive evening in Victory Square outside the government offices, shouting “Social Democratic Party, the red plague!” and “Resign!” In smaller numbers, about 2,000 protesters gathered outside the presidential palace yelling “Get out, you traitor!”

Iohannis, who was elected in 2014 by direct vote, was chairman of the opposition Liberal Party. He quit the party that year to stand as president.

He has been critical of the government headed by Prime Minister Sorin Grindeanu, which came into being after the December parliamentary elections.

The government “has been saying publicly I can’t stomach the result of the vote … that I’d overturn a legitimate government,” Iohannis said. “That’s false. You won, now govern and legislate, but not at any price.”

Some lawmakers booed and shouted “shame on you!” at Iohannis and walked out. Other lawmakers cheered.

Despite the crisis, Iohannis said Romania didn’t need early elections, a view the government shares.

Liviu Dragnea, chairman of the governing Social Democratic Party, and Senate speaker Calin Popescu Tariceanu refused to greet the president when he arrived at Parliament.

In his speech, Iohannis pressed ahead with an earlier initiative to hold a referendum on another government initiative to pardon prisoners. Critics say the proposal will help government allies convicted of corruption.

Dragnea, the main power broker behind the government, expressed disappointment Iohannis did not deliver a “speech of unity,” and said “he should leave the government alone, to govern.”

People hold Romanian national flag during a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday t...

People hold Romanian national flag during a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

People gather for a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a "full...

People gather for a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)

Protesters wave EU, U.S., French and Romanian flags during a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis told la...

Protesters wave EU, U.S., French and Romanian flags during a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

People gather for a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a "full...

People gather for a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

A girl shouts slogans during a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is...

A girl shouts slogans during a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)

People gather for a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a "full...

People gather for a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)

A man with a mask holds a banner that reads "Resignation" during a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis t...

A man with a mask holds a banner that reads “Resignation” during a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)

A man holds a cross that reads: "God is with us" during a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis told lawma...

A man holds a cross that reads: “God is with us” during a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)

The shadow of a police officer is seen on Romanian flag during a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis tol...

The shadow of a police officer is seen on Romanian flag during a protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)

A man shouts slogans during a pro-government protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday ...

A man shouts slogans during a pro-government protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

A man shouts slogans during a pro-government protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday ...

A man shouts slogans during a pro-government protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

People shout slogans during a pro-government protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday ...

People shout slogans during a pro-government protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

People shout slogans during a pro-government protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday ...

People shout slogans during a pro-government protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

People shout slogans during a pro-government protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday ...

People shout slogans during a pro-government protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

A man holds a banner that reads: "(Romanian President Klaus) Iohannis Resignation" during a pro-government protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 20...

A man holds a banner that reads: “(Romanian President Klaus) Iohannis Resignation” during a pro-government protest in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president Klaus Iohannis told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

An opposition lawmaker wears an armband that reads "Resignation" before Romania's President Klaus Iohannis speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tu...

An opposition lawmaker wears an armband that reads “Resignation” before Romania’s President Klaus Iohannis speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

Romania's President Klaus Iohannis pauses during his speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president told lawmaker...

Romania’s President Klaus Iohannis pauses during his speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

Romania's President Klaus Iohannis waves to lawmakers before his speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president t...

Romania’s President Klaus Iohannis waves to lawmakers before his speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

Lawmakers walk out during Romania's President Klaus Iohannis' speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president told...

Lawmakers walk out during Romania’s President Klaus Iohannis’ speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

Romania's President Klaus Iohannis smiles before his speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president told lawmaker...

Romania’s President Klaus Iohannis smiles before his speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

Romania's President Klaus Iohannis waves to lawmakers before his speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president t...

Romania’s President Klaus Iohannis waves to lawmakers before his speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

Romania's President Klaus Iohannis gestures during his speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania's president told lawmak...

Romania’s President Klaus Iohannis gestures during his speech at the parliament in Bucharest, Romania, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Romania’s president told lawmakers Tuesday the country is in a “fully-fledged” political crisis, after hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a government measure that would weaken the country’s anti-corruption drive. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/ap/article-4199238/Romania-president-We-crisis.html#ixzz4Y3OpFUAx
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/ap/article-4199238/Romania-president-We-crisis.html#ixzz4Y3OPrAlB
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/ap/article-4199238/Romania-president-We-crisis.html#ixzz4Y3OPrAlB
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

America’s Looming War with Iran : What You’re Not Being Told

NEWS

America’s Looming War with Iran : What You’re Not Being Told

By: Darius Shahtahmasebi

(ANTIMEDIA) The mainstream media has attempted to frame Donald J. Trump’s election victory as a sort of collusion between Russia and Trump — a scheme allegedly intended to promote an American president who would do Vladimir Putin’s bidding. But the truth is that there is one other country that stands to be the prime beneficiary of Trump’s reign as president: Israel.

Under the Obama administration, the United States had a curious relationship with Israel. In 2011, Obama vetoed a U.N. Security Council Resolution that would have condemned Israel’s settlement expansion. During Obama’s tenure, Israel’s settlement population rose from 100,000 to 600,000. According to Obama’s secretary of state, John Kerry, no administration in U.S. history has done more for Israel than Obama’s did:

“Our military exercises are more advanced than ever. Our assistance for Iron Dome has saved countless Israeli lives. We have consistently supported Israel’s right to defend itself by itself, including during actions [in] Gaza that sparked great controversy.”

In 2016, Obama approved a “record” military package to Israel worth $38 billion, nullifying claims that Obama “abandoned” Israel following the decision to withhold its veto on a resolution marking Israel’s settlements illegal at the end of 2016. As noted by Kerry:

“In the midst of our own financial crisis and budget deficits, we repeatedly increased funding to support Israel. In fact, more than 1/2 of our entire global foreign military financing goes to Israel. And this fall we concluded an historic $38 billion memorandum of understanding that exceeds any military assistance package the United States has provided to any country at any time.” [emphasis added]

However, on the surface, Obama appeared to be at odds with Israel’s Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu over one key issue: Iran. The Iranian nuclear agreement reached in 2015 was heralded as a progressive move by some, but Israel completely rejected it and has refused to be bound by the agreement.

That being said, there is something Israel has done throughout Obama’s presidency that has barely attracted a blink from the U.N. Following the outbreak of war in Syria, Israel struck Syria multiple times (for example, during 2012201320142015, etc).

Why is this important? Because Iran and Syria are bound by a mutual defense agreement. In fact, Israel assassinated an Iranian general in Syria in 2015 with little to no outrage from the international community.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF U.S.-IRAN RELATIONS

Iran has been a major problem for the U.S.-Israel establishment for a long time. Iran’s defiant stance and desire to control its own oil supply in the face of U.S. hegemony has been a big issue for decades, as has its proximity to Russia and China. In 1953, the CIA overthrew Iran’s democratically elected leader, Mohammed Mossadegh, because he nationalized Iran’s oil fields. As noted by the Guardian:

“Britain, and in particular Sir Anthony Eden, the foreign secretary, regarded Mosaddeq as a serious threat to its strategic and economic interests after the Iranian leader nationalised the British Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, latterly known as BP. But the UK needed US support. The Eisenhower administration in Washington was easily persuaded.”

After installing a brutal U.S. dictator in the form of Shah Reza Pahlavi, the people of Iran overthrew the Shah in the 1979 revolution and rejected almost all American influence thereafter. Shortly afterward, the U.S. backed Saddam Hussein in Iraq to take out Iran in a brutal and bloody conflict that lasted close to a decade, nearly killing off an entire generation of Iranians. The U.S. knew Saddam Hussein was using chemical weapons, and the U.S. also secretly armed the Iranians to maximize the death toll.

Ever since the Iran-Iraq war came to an end, crippling sanctions and saber-rattling over Iran’s alleged nuclear program have been the go-to mantra for the U.S. establishment. George W. Bush and Dick Cheney prepped the Pentagon for a war with Iran in the early 2000s, but this war never occurred — most likely due to the duo’s lack of credibility after Iraq.

It must also be stated that Iran’s alleged nuclear program has been dramatically overhyped for decades (seriously, Netanyahu was crying wolf over Iran’s program as far back as 1996.)

In 2012, Israeli newspaper Haaretz reported that elements within both the CIA and Mossad agreed there was insufficient proof to determine whether Iran was building a nuclear bomb, despite “throwing everything they had” at the nuclear program. Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s grandiose U.N. speech in 2015 claiming Iran was moments away from making nuclear weapons was contradicted by his own intelligence agencies, who stated Iran was “not performing the activity necessary to produce nuclear weapons.”

Still, regime change in Iran and Syria has always been the ultimate goal of Israel, even in the face of this intelligence. In 2013, Israel’s ambassador to the U.S., Michael Oren, told the Jerusalem Post:

“The initial message about the Syrian issue was that we always wanted [President] Bashar Assad to go, we always preferred the bad guys who weren’t backed by Iran to the bad guys who were backed by Iran.”

According to the Post, Oren said this was the case even if the other “bad guys” were affiliated to al-Qaeda.

What does this mean? Exactly what it says: Israel prefers al-Qaeda – the group allegedly responsible for 9/11 – to the current governments of Iran and Syria.

Despite multiple strikes on Iran’s closest ally — and most likely due to Obama’s perceived success in diverting a war and securing an agreement that ultimately benefitted Iran’s rivals in the form of Israel and Saudi Arabia — Obama warned Israel not to surprise him with a direct strike on Iran.

Whether Obama was being sincere or not, on the face of it, this warning was successful in tying Israel’s hands.

THE ROAD TO WAR:

However, Obama’s (somewhat questionable) era is over. What we have now is Theresa May as prime minister of the United Kingdom and Donald J. Trump as president of the United States.

Speaking to Republican policymakers in Philadelphia, Theresa May stated that Britain and the U.S. will no longer invade sovereign foreign nations “in an attempt to make the world in their own image.” However, May also stated that pushing back on “Iran’s aggressive efforts” to increase its “arc of influence from Tehran through to the Mediterranean” was a “priority.”

Not surprisingly, as a result of her comments and commitment to the U.S.-U.K alliance, May just secured “100% support” for NATO from President Trump.

When the U.S. and U.K talk about Iran’s aggression in its attempts to spread its influence to the Mediterranean, they are referring to a number of different things. First, bear in mind that as explained above, there is no evidence Iran is building a nuclear bomb. Secondly, according to Colin Powell’s leaked emails, Israel has a stockpile of at least 200 nuclear bombs. Iran is well aware of this, as its former president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad once stated: “What would we do with one, polish it?’”

Third, it is no secret that Iran’s influence is spreading from Tehran to neighboring Iraq and through to Syria and Lebanon. But this in and of itself is not a crime; building relationships with your neighbors is common sense. Iran’s support for the designated terror group Hezbollah has all but been confirmed, but bear in mind that Hezbollah is one of the ground forces currently battling ISIS – the terror group that Trump singled out as his highest priority.

Finally, Iran has been accused endlessly of backing rebels in Yemen. This rationale has been used to promote an egregious and violent war, courtesy of Saudi Arabia. However, even just this past week, U.N. experts concluded:

“The panel has not seen sufficient evidence to confirm any direct large-scale supply of arms from the Government of the Islamic Republic of Iran, although there are indicators that anti-tank guided weapons being supplied to the Houthi or Saleh forces are of Iranian manufacture.” [emphasis added]

So, in essence, Iran is not producing nuclear weapons, nor is it backing rebels fighting on Saudi Arabia’s doorstep. This point cannot be stressed enough: despite Iran’s many warranted criticisms regarding mass executions, treatment of women and authoritarian rule, Iran is not doing any of the things the U.S. has accused it of doing as a rationale for a military strike on its people.

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS:

Even so, the United States Congress is currently debating a bill that would “authorize the use of the United States Armed Forces to achieve the goal of preventing Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons.” Congress might actually pass a law that will directly allow the U.S. military to strike Iran, even before there is any evidence that they pose a threat.

In a further attempt to provoke Iran, Trump’s travel ban list includes Iran, a country whose citizens have never once attacked the United States. The list excludes Saudi Arabia, the country that produced almost all of the 9/11 hijackers. Even Forbes admitted that since 1975, no Americans have been killed in terrorist attacks in the U.S. by citizens of the countries included in the ban.

To top things off, at the end of January, the U.K. and the U.S. will take part in operation “Unified Trident,” a joint exercise in the Persian Gulf that will simulate a military confrontation with Iran.

Before taking office, Trump stated he would dismantle the nuclear agreement with Tehran. Trump’s vow to wholeheartedly support Israel raises the possibility of granting Israel the confidence to attack Iran without any prior approval, thereby forcing the U.S. to come to Israel’s aid once the fight escalates.

This implied confidence is very real. Even days before Trump’s inauguration, Israel attacked a Syrian government airport. How often can this happen before Syria and/or Iran respond directly?

In the meantime, Iran is already responding in kind to the Trump administration’s recent policy initiatives. Just this past Sunday, Iran test-fired a ballistic missile, the first known test since Trump took office. While Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif stated Iran would “never use ballistic missiles to attack another country,” the U.S. has already called an urgent Security Council meeting to discuss the matter. Russia said the missile test has not contravened the U.N. Resolution on the Iranian nuclear accord, signaling where Russia’s allegiance may ultimately lie.

Further, Iranian state-run news site Press TV reported that if parties to the nuclear accord refrain from honoring their commitments, Iran has warned it will resume its nuclear activities to the levels that existed before the agreement was enforced.

Most importantly, according to a report in the local English-language daily, the Financial Tribune, the Iranian government announced it is going to stop using the U.S. dollar in its official statements. There is much speculation that Iraq’s decision to drop the U.S. dollar for the Euro in 2000 prompted Bush to attack Iraq in 2003, so it would be wise to keep an eye on these developments.

According to AlterNet, Trump has assembled a team that is “obsessed with Iran.” Not surprisingly, in response to the Iranian missile launch, the Trump administration has officially put Iran “on notice.” The White House has even used the actions of the Houthi rebels in Yemen as an excuse to make sure the Iranians “[understand] we are not going to sit by and not act on their actions,” but as explained above, even the U.N. has found no evidence of direct Iranian involvement in Yemen.

WHERE ARE WE HEADED?

A war with Iran would be the end of the world as we know it. Iran has an enormous ground force, including countless volunteer militias who are experienced in repelling invaders (as Iraq found out the hard way in the 1980s.)

Nuclear powers Russia and China have warned the U.S. countless times not to attack Iran or Syria. Russia was clearly not making idle threats, as in 2015 they put their money where their mouth was and overtly intervened in the Syrian war to defend the Syrian government against U.S.-backed mercenaries. It is not clear if Russia has the ability — or the willpower — to finance another defensive effort in support of Iran, but what Russia has been adept at, in addition to relentlessly dropping bombs, is diplomacy. Take, for example, Obama’s failure to strike Syria in 2013 in part due to Russia’s diplomatic intervention.

China, on the other hand, is less likely to attempt diplomacy with Trump. A Chinese military official has already warned that a Chinese-U.S. war is becoming a “practical reality” under President Trump, and given Trump’s hardline approach to China, it wouldn’t be a stretch to predict who China would side with in this dispute. Further, a Chinese general already previously stated that China would defend Iran even if it meant “World War III.”

Additionally, NATO member Turkey has indicated it may seek to formally align itself with Russia and China, a move that could put Turkey in direct alliance with Iran considering Iran is also looking to formally join this Eurasian alliance.

When will this madness end? In the words of Noam Chomsky, the United States has been “torturing” Iran for 60 years. The intention to take out Iran is still on the table, even with the so-called “anti-establishment” candidate in office.

Clearly, the world cannot continue down this path towards nuclear annihilation. The current industrial war machine must be dismantled.

Unsurprisingly, former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, a man with vast experience in diffusing nuclear tensions, has warned that the whole world appears to be preparing for war. His message is one that the whole world needs to hear:

In [the] modern world, wars must be outlawed, because none of the global problems we are facing can be resolved by war — not poverty, nor the environment, migration, population growth, or shortages of resources.” [emphasis added]


This article (America’s Looming War with Iran: What You’re Not Being Told) is free and open source. You have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Darius Shahtahmasebi and theAntiMedia.org. Anti-Media Radio airs weeknights at 11 pm Eastern/8 pm Pacific. If you spot a typo, please email the error and name of the article to edits@theantimedia.org.

British man held in Trump assassination attempt. At least one of us has some balls.

Dismay and disbelief in the UK over accusations that Michael Sandford attempted to shoot Donald Trump at a campaign rally in Las Vegas

attempted to shoot Donald Trump at a campaign rally in Las Vegas

Current Time0:00
/
Duration Time0:19
Loaded: 0%
Progress: 0%

Mute

British man arrested at Trump rally in Las Vegas ‘after trying to seize police gun’

The British man who allegedly set out to write a new and bloody chapter in American history by assassinating Donald Trump during a campaign rally has been described by friends and neighbours as a nice guy who had never before shown violent tendencies. His father said he has Asperger’s syndrome.

Michael Sandford, 20, allegedly approached a police officer at the event in Las Vegas to say he wanted Trump’s autograph, but then tried to grab his holstered gun. He was tackled and frogmarched from the venue.

When asked why he had done it, Sandford, from Dorking, Surrey, told police: “To shoot and kill Trump,” according to US court papers. He had been planning the assassination for “about a year” and was convinced he would die in the attempt.

On Tuesday the Republican candidate’s son, Donald Trump Jr, praised “real professionals” in local law enforcement and the secret service for protecting his father.

Sandford had arrived in Las Vegas last Friday, when he went to a local shooting range and reportedly learned how to use a gun for the first time. The Trump rally at the Treasure Island Casino was held the following day.

Trump has been accused of inciting violence at his events, where attendees have to pass through airport-style metal detectors. In March a protester attempted to storm the stage outside Dayton, Ohio, prompting secret service agents to jump on stage to surround Trump. More recently there has been chaos outside rallies in San Jose, California, and Albuquerque, New Mexico.

On Monday, Sandford was denied bail at a district court in Nevada, where he appeared charged with an act of violence on restricted grounds.

Federal magistrate judge George Foley declined to release Sandford, who appeared before him in leg irons, over concerns that he was a potential danger to the community and a flight risk. He will appear in court again on 5 July.

A federal public defender told the court that Sandford was autistic yet competent, although he did not enter a plea. His mother, Lynne Sandford, told court researchers that her son was treated for obsessive compulsive disorder and anorexia when he was younger, and that he once ran away from a hospital, according to the public defender.

Sandford apparently did not have permission to be in the US after overstaying a visa, and was unemployed. Papers filed at the court said he had been in the country for around 18 months and lived in Hoboken, New Jersey.

He had driven across the US to San Bernardino, California, and had been living out of his car before travelling on to Las Vegas on Thursday.

On Friday, he visited the Battlefield Vegas shooting range where he practised using a 9mm Glock pistol, firing off 20 rounds.

The following day he went to the Treasure Island Casino where Trump was addressing a rally of 1,500 supporters amid tight security.

Gregg Donovan, 56, who queued for nine hours to see Trump, told the Washington Post that Sandford asked him, “Why do you like Donald Trump?” and “seemed a little bit repulsed” when he saw Donovan wearing Trump memorabilia. Sandford was acting “weird” and “nervous”, waving his hands and looking uncomfortable, Donovan told the Post.

Sandford had also bought a ticket to a rally in Phoenix, Arizona, for later on Saturday as a back-up, according to the secret service report.

Michael Sandford bedroom

The bedroom of Michael Sandford, the British man who allegedly tried to assassinate Donald Trump. Photograph: Facebook

Across the Atlantic, there was dismay and disbelief at his actions.

His father, Paul Davey, from Havant, was quoted by the MailOnline website as saying: “He’s never shown any violent tendencies before. He’s never been a bad person.

“He’s a nice kid and literally wouldn’t hurt a fly – he used to tell us not to use fly spray because he didn’t want any flies to die.”

Davey said someone must have coerced or “radicalised” his son into attacking the presidential candidate. “He has never mentioned Donald Trump. The reason it is such a shock is because he shows no interest in anything like that … I doubt he would even know who the president of the United States is.”

In a separate interview with the Portsmouth News, he added: “Whether he’s been blackmailed or put up to it, that’s the only thing me and his mum can think of. It’s so against his nature and obviously with his Asperger’s, we think somebody has got hold of him and done something.”

His mother Lynne, who also lives in Dorking in a council-owned property, is “devastated”, a friend told the Evening Standard. She is understood to have left her home in the company of police on Tuesday morning.

One neighbour, who asked not to be named, said Sandford was a big fan of the BBC television programme Robot Wars. “I would often see him outside by the garage building things, he was very good at metal work,” he said. “He was a nice guy. As far as I know he got on well with his mum.”

A web page for the Fighting Robots Association listed Michael and Lynne Sandford and Paul Davey as owners of a number of robots, including machines named ‘Mr Nasty’, ‘X-Terminator’ and ‘Steel Avenger’.

An elderly neighbour, who did not give her name, said: “He used to say ‘hello’, which is good in this day and age.”

Neighbours at Sandford’s former flat on Cottondene in Dorking said they did not know the 20-year-old but believe he moved away 18 months ago. It is understood he told his mother he was visiting a girlfriend in the US.

A former classmate of Sandford, who is now 20 and was in his Year 6 class at Powell Corderoy Primary School in Dorking, said: “My boyfriend’s mum showed me an article about it this morning and asked if I had gone to school with him and as soon as I saw the picture I recognised him.

“All I remember about him from school is he was a bit of a strange one and I never really spoke to him.”

He went on to attend Ashcombe school, said headteacher David Blow, but he declined to comment further.

Sandford was carrying a UK driving licence at the time he was arrested.

A Foreign Office spokesman said: “We are providing assistance following an arrest of a British national in Las Vegas.”

A Surrey Police spokesman said: “Surrey Police is aware of an incident in Las Vegas on Saturday 18 June which resulted in the arrest of a UK national from Surrey.

“The force is currently providing family liaison support on behalf of the Foreign Commonwealth Office.”

FBI investigates Novus Health Care founder for hospice homicides

Slide1.png

 

More than disturbing, this story may be an emotional trigger for some. Dallas Morning News reports on the owner of a Frisco medical company who regularly directed nurses to “overdose hospice patients” with drugs such as morphine to “speed up their deaths and maximize profits.”

In an affidavit written by the FBI, Brad Harris, the founder of Novus Heath Care Services Inc., sent text messages like, “You need to make this patient go bye-bye.” 

No charges have been filed against Novus or Harris. Harris, 34, did not return messages left with a receptionist and at his Frisco home.

Harris, an accountant, told a nurse to overdose three patients and directed another employee to increase a patient’s medication to four times the maximum allowed, the FBI said.

In the first case, the employee refused to follow the alleged instructions, the agent wrote in the affidavit. The document does not say whether the other three patients were actually harmed.

Harris also told other health care executives over a lunch meeting that he wanted to “find patients who would die within 24 hours,” and made comments like, “if this f— would just die,” an FBI agent wrote in the warrant.

Given the above assertions, it’s turns the stomach to read the company’s website mission statement.

“We have a saying at Novus, be fast and treat people the way we would want to be treated. This encourages us to go the extra mile to make patients feel comfortable and secure about their special needs and requests.”

Scott Gordon with NBCDFW.com emphasizes that health care providers do not necessarily make more money for longer hospice stays. They are subject to an “aggregator cap,” which limits Medicare and Medicaid payments based on the yearly average hospice stay. In an affidavit, the FBI says the provider can be forced to pay back part of their payments to the government if patients live longer.

“Hence, hospice providers have an incentive to enroll patients whose hospice stays will be short relative to the cap.”

The FBI began its investigation into Novus back in October 2014 and initially focused on previous medical fraud allegations that Novus was recruiting patients “who did not qualify for services” and charged the government for services that were not medically necessary. Harris has no medical training or licenses, and would direct his employed nurses to overdose hospice patients with palliative medications such as morphine to hasten death, and thereby minimize Novus’s [paybacks] under the cap. While interviewing some of Novus employees, FBI reported that Harris would decide which home care patients would be moved to hospice. He would have employees (who were not licensed doctors) to sign the certifications with the names of doctors also employed by Novus. If a patient was on hospice care for too long, thus ultimately costing Novus, Harris would direct the patient back to home health, “irrespective of whether the patient needed continued hospice care.”

In a lunch meeting, the FBI said, Harris asked two health care executives to “find patients who would die within 24 hours” because that would “save my ass toward the cap.”

Speaking of one of his patients, Harris said “words to the effect of, ‘If this f— would just die.’”

This story almost seems surreal. It’s like something we’d see in a horror movie. Gordon adds the FBI is working with investigators from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which provides health benefits for people 65 and older. Medicaid is mostly funded by federal tax dollars to provide healthcare for the poor.

Once again, the poor become the victims of extreme medical, corporate, and political corruption. It’s so important for a story like this to surface, be republished, and be shared throughout social media. Awareness is the first step to change.

For Full Story: NBCDFW.com.

For more information about elder abuse, visit government agency: The National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA)

Here is an LTV2 YouTube blog clip that includes further discussion of the story

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sean Penn says Mexico wants him in crosshairs of Chapo’s cartel

Actor Sean Penn (L) shakes hands with Mexican drug lord Joaquin ''Chapo'' Guzman in Mexico, in this undated Rolling Stone handout photo obtained by Reuters on January 10, 2016. REUTERS/Rolling Stone/Handout via Reuters

Oscar-winning actor Sean Penn on Friday rejected Mexico’s claim that his secret meeting with Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman was crucial to the drug kingpin’s recapture, saying officials were trying to put him in the crosshairs of the feared cartel.

Penn also told talk show host Charlie Rose that he regrets the fallout from the Rolling Stone article based on his interview with Guzman. Their meeting in a jungle hideout was the first interview anyone scored with the fugitive drug lord, and Penn said he had hoped it would spur a broader discussion on the drug war.

In Penn’s first major television interview about the meeting, Rose asked the actor whether he believed Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto’s government had deliberately sought to credit him with Guzman’s capture to put him at risk from the Sinaloa Cartel.

“Yes,” Penn replied.

“There is this myth about the visit that we made, my colleagues and I with El Chapo, that it was… ‘essential’ to his capture,” Penn said.

“We know the Mexican government, they clearly were humiliated by the notion that someone found him before they did,” added Penn.

The actor, who has won Oscars for “Mystic River” and “Milk,” said he met Guzman “many weeks” before his arrest, in a location far from where the kingpin fell into police hands in northern Mexico six months after staging a spectacular prison break through a tunnel in his cell floor.

“I have a terrible regret,” Penn said in the interview recorded on Thursday in California. “I have a regret that the entire discussion about this article ignores its purpose, which was to try to contribute to this discussion about the policy on the war on drugs.”

“Let me be clear. My article has failed,” said Penn.

Rolling Stone published Penn’s article on Saturday, a day after Guzman’s recapture. The piece cited the drug lord boasting about smuggling drugs into the United States, and about laundering ill-gotten gains. (rol.st/1PXKv56)

Guzman’s lawyer on Wednesday accused Penn of lying, and said he should be called to give evidence.

“He (Guzman) could not have made these claims… Mr Guzman is a very serious man, very intelligent,” Juan Pablo Badillo said. “Where’s the proof? Where’s the audio?”

Neither Penn’s publicist nor Rolling Stone have commented on Badillo’s claims. The excerpt of the Rose interview, published ahead of its full airing on CBS on Sunday, did not address the lawyer’s comments.

A government spokesman said on Tuesday that Mexico was not directly investigating Penn nor his companion, actress Kate del Castillo, but rather the circumstances around the meeting.

(This story has been corrected in paragraph 12 to insert dropped name “Juan Pablo”)

(Reporting by Laila Kearney and Jill Serjeant; Editing by Simon Gardner and David Gregorio)

 

Video montage of Military might.

Nato prepares for war with Russia.

Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group transits the Surigao Strait on Sept. 27, 2014. US Navy Photo

NATO • North Atlantic Treaty Organization • OTAN

 

Royal Armoured Corps

Су-34 • Sukhoi Su-34 «Fullback»

M1 Abrams

ВМФ России • Военно-морской флот РФ • Russian Navy

 

 

MFA Dassault Rafale • МЦИ Дассо «Рафаль»

 

Leopard 2 • Main Battle Tank

 

US Army Rangers & 75th Ranger Regiment

 

For more subscribe to Anton Komogortsev YouTube page!